Khorak-e Loobia - Red Kidney Beans Side Dish (Repost)



This is a repost of the recipe I wrote back in 2008 when I was a brand new food blogger. Khorak-e loobia is a near and dear dish to my heart not just because it's delicious and healthy but because it brings back treasured memories of when life seemed so simple and all your troubles could be gone with your mother's encouraging words and warm hugs. I'm not sure how this post never got published correctly. The link to the original post doesn't go anywhere. There seems to be a disconnect between the link and the actual post and the only way you can see it is by going through the archives of that year. I am not that computer savvy and I don't know how to fix this problem. Since I didn't want to let this post disappear on my blog I decided to post it again!


 My mother had a large, fish-shaped glass serving bowl with scale and fin patterns that she would use for serving these cooked beans. I am always on the look out to find the exact replica of that fish bowl but haven't found it yet. My mother's recipe called for using a generous amount of olive oil, extra ab-limoo (freshly squeezed lemon juice) and no tomato sauce. However, I added a little tomato paste to this recipe. I like the combination of red kidney beans and the tomato flavor. You can make khorak-e loobia with tomato paste/tomato sauce or even fresh tomatoes or without it. Also, you can use red vinegar instead of lemon juice. Khorak-e loobia can be made with pinto beans as well.




Khorak-e Loobia - Red Kidney Beans Side Dish
Ingredients:
Serves 4-6
2 cups red kidney beans
2 large onions, finely chopped
4 large cloves of garlic, minced
3-4 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons tomato paste
Juice of 2-3 lemons/limes (use more if you prefer)
Salt and pepper to taste
Water

Method:
  1. Pick over the beans, rinse thoroughly and soak in water overnight.
  2. Pour the soaking water out, rinse and place the beans in a large pot, add six cups of water, bring to a rapid boil on high heat, reduce the heat and cook for 15 minutes over medium-high heat.
  3. Drain the beans in a colander, return back into the pot, add enough water to cover by a couple of inches, cover and cook for an hour on medium heat. 
  4. In a skillet, saute the chopped onions in olive oil until golden brown.
  5. Add garlic and saute for another 2-3 minutes.
  6. Then add the tomato paste, salt and pepper, saute for another 1-2 minutes, stir well.
  7. Add a cup of warm water, simmer on low heat for 10-15 minutes.
  8. Pour the content - onion, garlic and sauce mixture into the pot, stir.
  9. Add lemon juice, taste and adjust the seasoning, cover and simmer for another 20-30 minutes.

Khorak-e loobia can be served warm or cold with warm bread, kotlet, and salad shirazi.

P.S: I tweaked the recipe just a little bit and added new photos.

 ***

Poem by: Hatef Esfahani 

Enjoy!

20 comments:

  1. Delicious!
    I love this.
    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Azita,

    I am looking forward to trying this one soon. I did your pinto beans and salad, and now it is a permanent feature at home. I never thought of using cold beans, or that they could taste so good with oil and lemon. At least where I come from (Latinamerica), I've never heard of anything like this, even though we eat beans daily. So far I've done the salad with brown Swedish beans and with pinto beans, works beautifully with both. Thanks for rescuing the kidney bean recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I will try this tonight! It looks delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Love your photo! Makes me want to make this dish immediately! Wish I understood Persian and could enjoy the poem.

    ReplyDelete
  5. thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Bonsoir,

    Ouvre les yeux de ton coeur, tu verras l'âme
    Ce qui n'est point visible, tu le verras.

    Si tu te retournes vers "les contrées" de l'amour
    tu verras tous les horizons comme un jardin de roses !

    Voila, tant bien que mal, la traduction de ces vers,
    tellement jolis en persan !

    sarvenaz

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks for sharing this recipe. I will try out for my own. If better I will inform you. Thanks for this recipe. When you will post your another recipe?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Just wanted to say that I have to (have to!) try your recipe - it sounds delicious and so simple and healthy. ps I'll be on the lookout for fish-shaped glass serving bowl for you! (so touching)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hello, A very beautiful dish one I would be happy to eat! I just found your blog and I'm loving it - going to follow you now!
    Love , henia @ simplicity of my table by the sea - http://simplicitybythesea.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Azita,
    I lived with an Iranian man until 12 months ago when the relationship ended. Your blog is now my "link" to the Iranian cuisine, which I became very fond of - so I just wanted to say thanks for all the delicious recipes you've posted here.
    Tine in Denmark

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oh my goodness, this dish looks so delicious! I am moving towards more meatless entrees and I plan to try this recipe. Thank you so much for sharing your culture and dishes! I lived in Iran in the mid-1970s and my husband is Kormanshahri, so your blog is near and dear to my heart.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Azita Jann,
    This is Delicious!
    I wanted to ask- What is Adiveh?
    I had some at home but I did not know how to use it.
    Thanks,
    Amay

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Amay,advieh is a spice blend, a combination of turmeric, cumin, cinnamon, cardamom, coriander and rose petals.

      Delete
  13. Una receta deliciosa! La voy a probar seguro! Un abrazo y Feliz Año Nuevo!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Is this a khorak or a khoresht? What's the difference, anyway?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shiva, this is a khorak. khoresh generally refers to different types of stews such as fesenjoon and ghormeh sabzi. Khorak in Persian means food and also refers to meals made with chicken,fish or vegetables.

      Delete
  15. Bingo! I came across this recipe as a result of my attempt to make "maash" for my husband. He is Persian/Armenian and described a dish he has been craving that consisted of beans & tomatoes in a stew. He recalls eating this as a young boy. I'm delighted I've found this post, considering I did a Google search for maash and wound up with a vast list of Indian recipes for curry type dishes!

    ReplyDelete