Mast-o-Khorfeh - Yogurt with Purslane


Yogurt with Purslane (khorfeh) is the best food to beat the summer heat. There's nothing more refreshing and satisfying than a cool cup of yogurt mixed in with coarsely chopped fresh purslane picked right from your own garden. I've never planted purslane since they grow on their own and are actually considered weeds. I used to pull them out and discard them, until one summer that my mother came to visit us at our new home and she had discovered purslane in the vegetable garden. I knew they looked familiar from back home but since I didn't plant them in my garden I was hesitant to eat them. But when my mother handed me a bunch of purslane and said to make a mast-o-khorfeh for lunch, I made it and loved the taste and the texture of it. That summer we got to have purslane with yogurt, mixed in with salads or simply added to the vegetable platter (sabzi khordan).


Ever since then, I look for them in our garden during the summer and we don't use any pesticides in order to try and grow everything healthy and safe for consumption. However, it seems that more and more people are discovering the health benefits and the nutritional values of purslane. They are known as a source of Omega 3 fatty acids and antioxidants, vitamin C and E.


Ingredients:
Serves 2-3

2 cups plain yogurt
A handful of purslane, pull the leaves off the stems, wash and drain, coarsely chopped if leaves are big
1/2 teaspoon dried mint
Salt and pepper to taste

Method:
  1. In a large bowl combine all ingredients, mix well.
  2. Transfer into a serving bowl, cover and chill in the refrigerator for at least an hour or until ready to serve.
Serve cold with warm bread.

Variation:  Purslane may be added to Yogurt and Cucumber (Mast-o-Khiar) , Salad Shirazi and the platter of Sabzi Khordan.

Enjoy!

10 comments:

  1. I had never seen or heard of purslane until I moved to California. The first time I had it, it was done Mexican style, stewed with chilis and tomatoes, and I thought it was very tasty. Looking forward to trying it with yogurt!

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  2. Thank you for always giving us new recipes to raise some eyebrows around the table, always look forward to your posts.

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  3. Lovely and refreshing recipe. Came here from Chow and chatter. We get the same greens here in India, though I cook it often, don't know its name.
    Nice to be here, best wishes. Following you to get more of such info.

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  4. I use this plant, which I found growing wild in the garden, for ground cover: it looks pretty and stops taller weeds from making an appearance. Had no idea what it was called so I'm thrilled to discover you can eat it!

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  5. I never had purslane before, sounds delicious and refreshing :)

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  6. I made this salad with a bit of garlic, the way it is eaten in Lebanon; very refreshing and so delicious!
    did not know it was done in Iran as wel!

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  7. Oh! I never heard of purslane...would love to try it :-)

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  8. can you believe that i had this for the first time when i was in istanbul this summer? i love this and i am so happy you blogged about it- and lovely photos- white and green- bright and vibrant. x shayma

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  9. OMG YOUR BLOG MAKES ME SO HAPPY!

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  10. Oh! That's what that is! I bought some at a market in Athens a couple of months ago, it was fresh and juicy and I used some in a tomato salad. I have heard the word "Purslane" before but never knew what it described. Now I do! Excellent! Thanks!

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